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Fascinating Story Quilts

This week I received an envelope from my first quilting teacher, and very dear friend, Sharon Grieve Grinyer. In it was a newspaper clipping from the Wisconsin State Journal that took me back to 1989. The article was entitled:

And begins with:

“There’s a good story behind Rumi O’Brien’s quilt called “Hiding Under Shrubs – I’m Too Famous.” There’s a story, in fact, behind every Rumi O’Brien quilt.” Made from tiny scraps of cloth and laced with thousands of minute stitches, O’Brien’s handiwork is consistently clever, always unexpected, and often very funny.”

To read the entire article, go to:  http://host.madison.com/wsj/entertainment/arts-and-theatre/the-whimsy-of-rumi/article_c9885798-72cb-5f90-8825-b43b25ea9c6b.html

Rumi is a quilter I met early in my quilt journey, while taking part in my first quilt challenge. This all brought to mind a story I think you’ll find quite interesting and I’d like to present it in two parts.

Part 1 begins with a multi-country quilt challenge. I still have a photo of the original challenge exhibit sign and this is what it said:

“In early Autumn, 1989, Georgellen Mikkelson was contacted about orgainizing the Madison, WI, end of a quilt challenge between quilters in Freiberg, Germany (Madison’s Sister City), Berne, Switzerland, and Madison, WI. She gathered a varied group of 21 quilters, and anxiously awaited the arrival of the “Challenge Fabric” from West Germany.

The participating quilters were each given a 12″ square of each of the fabrics. Five additional fabrics of the quilter’s choice could be used. The finished quilts were to be no larger than 24″ x 24″.

In January of 1990, the Madison quilts were shipped to Europe. They were on display, along with the Freiburg and Berne quilts, in both European cities. The entire group of quilts – all 65 of them – will be on display here in the Madison Civic Center until July 1990.”

I found these leftover pieces of the challenge fabric stuffed in a page of the photo album with the challenge pictures. Maybe I had a premonition I’d need them for a blog someday :-)!

I enjoyed making my challenge quilt (to see it, you’ll need to read next week’s post for part 2 🙂 ).

When it was time to get together and see all the Madison quilts, there was one that really caught my attention. It was Rumi’s. Her quilt told the story of the challenge in hand appliqué!

Amazing! And hand quilted too. I was so impressed, I signed up to take a class from her at a local quilt shop. The class was called “Making Babies” and we made 2 little dolls. Rumi was a wonderful teacher and the stories she shared of her life in Japan were delightful. I lost touch with her after that class.

A few weeks ago Sommer found those dolls in a toy bin and began playing with them in her doll house.

After reading the article about Rumi in the paper, I had to dig out the old photo album and revisit my memories of the challenge and Rumi.

I can’t wait to make the trip to Madison and see the exhibit of her quilts. The exhibit is entitled: “Crossing Mountains and Other Adventures – Story Quilts by Rumi O’Brien”. For all the information go to:  https://sohe.wisc.edu/research-development/design-gallery/2016-17/crossing-mountains-and-other-adventures-story-quilts-by-rumi-obrien/.

Next week: part 2 of the Sister City Challenge!

 


January 29, 2017, Challenges
A Great Binding Tip!

A number of years ago my friend Jean  showed our Open Lab class a clever way to control binding while attaching it to a quilt (to read a previous post about some lovely placemats Jean made, click here!). I thought I had posted about it, but can’t seem to find that post (after 6 years of blogging I’ve covered a lot of topics!)

The concept is quite simple and it requires 2 easily obtained supplies: an empty toilet paper roll and a piece of ribbon. After making enough binding to go around her quilt, Jean rolls it onto the toilet paper roll, threads the roll onto a length of ribbon, ties the ribbon around her neck, and stitches the binding to her quilt. The binding feeds evenly off the roll in an extremely organized fashion. Brilliant!

Fast forward to this past Christmas. Connie, another Open Lab friend, was making tree skirts (I posted about them in December – click here for that post). She chose to couch silver cording onto one of the tree skirts (for couching instructions click here). Jean just happened to have one of her special rolls with her and it made the couching oh so much easier:

Connie added the cording with Jean’s binding roller.

couching roll

Here’s a close up of the couching. It really added some extra zip to the tree skirt!

Thanks Jean, and Connie 🙂 !

I don’t know why I haven’t tried this yet, but I know what I’ll be doing with my next empty toilet paper roll.

Let me know if you try this. A picture of your project would be fun too!


January 22, 2017, Embellishing finishing
A Winter Window Quilt

Last Summer I shared the story of a winter quilt I’d completed (click here to read that post). Well, it’s finally hanging on the wall!

Today’s post is about another winter wall quilt, recently finished, and a quick tutorial on a fun raw edge appliqué technique that doesn’t require fusibles! It’s a very different quilt from the first one, and is hung in a unique way.

In November my friend Doris Deutmeyer gave a lecture and workshop for Patched Lives quilt guild. You may have seen her wonderful work at quilt shows, as she vends at many of them. Her patterns and kits are great, and just in case you’d like to see more, go to: http://fabricationsbydoris.com/wpsite/. I was excited to take her class and chose a winter scene called Crystal Night. This is the pattern and the piece I left class with (some of the students got theirs pieces done and matted!)

winter-window-and-pattern

Mike and I like to repurpose antiques for our own use and enjoyment (to see another antique repurposing project from a few years ago, click here). Years ago we needed a towel rack in the master bathroom. We found an old window, Mike added coat hooks to the sides and I made an autumn landscape quilt to fit inside it. Since we have no windows in this bathroom (only skylights), it seemed the perfect answer.

I had told Mike I’d make a quilt for every season – but that never happened. As I was making my Crystal Night quilt I realized the time had arrived to change out the seasons (or at least one of them)!

I ordered some extra fabric from Doris, because the new center was too small for the window. I measured how much I needed to add to all 4 sides, knowing the sides were going to be a bit of a challenge. I wanted the distant trees and mountains to match up and look more organic – a straight seam would be too obvious.

winter-window-in-progress

I decided to use one of my favorite “raw edged landscape” techniques. I placed the light blue fabric over the dark blue, making sure there was enough overlap. Then I drew a “mountain” line and stitched:

winter-window-sewing-landscape

Next I trimmed close to the line.

winter-window-trimming-landscape

Once both sides were done I added them and sewed the additional sky and snow on top and bottom. After layering, quilting, binding and placing it in the frame – we have a towel rack with a winter view:

The Springtime view is already beginning to percolate through my brain.

Do you like to repurpose antiques? Any pictures you’d like to share?


January 15, 2017, Appliqué finishing
Silly Goose

So here’s a fun way to begin the new year – sharing pictures of my latest quilt! A few weeks ago I mentioned that my most recent contest quilt had been accepted into the New Quilts From an Old Favorite contest at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, KY. The judging is completed and I’m now free to share my quilt with you. The traditional block the museum chose this year was Flying Geese. While at the AQS show in Paducah this past Spring I got my idea. It’s called Silly Goose, and the label reads: “There’s one in every crowd. She just can’t follow the leader or the rules. What a silly goose!”

flying geese variation

It was great fun creating the crazy, silly-ness in the solo silly goose.

I used stretchy metallic fabric once again. You may remember my first experience with that in “40 Wonderful Years” (click here for that post). It was a challenge to sew on, but the stretchiness gave the trapunto a shine I loved. The only color I couldn’t find in a Spandex™ type fabric was orange, so I tried polar fleece. Another non-traditional quilting fabric. It is a little fuzzy, but I was pleased with the results.

Next, came the quilting. That was even more fun! I chose to free motion embroider designs on the background fabric in neon thread, before I layered and trapunto’d the top. This allowed the embroidery to lay on top of the poofy areas.

machine embroidered trapunto

The effect was just what I was looking for.

Once begun, the quilting took on a life of it’s own, and it was a joy.

This was followed by fused crystals in the small amount of space that wasn’t yet stitched.

WooHoo! I hope you can see the joy I have in playing with fabric, color and design. The Flying Goose exhibit will be hanging in the National Quilt Museum during Quilt Week this Spring. Then it will travel for two years to many shows across the country. All the quilts will also be featured in a book, published by the museum. It’s always fun to have a quilt travel and visit places I have yet to see.

I praise God for the opportunities and joy He’s given me through quilting!

 


January 8, 2017, Embellishing free motion
Quilting Time

Happy New Year!

Before I jump into my first blog topic of the new year, I have a quick request for my readers in Canada. When Wendy and I take our next Sew We Go adventure to Canada this Fall, we will want to make some memorable quilt oriented stops along the way. If you have any suggestions for possible shops or contacts in Quebec, Sydney, Halifax or St. John’s, please send me an email at chris@chrisquilts.net . Thanks!

And for all of you in the US, I wanted to let you know we have reserved a few extra cabins on the Norwegian Dawn – just in case you’d still like to be a part of this exciting trip. And, we have a quilter who would like to join us, but is in need of a roommate. Please email me for more information  🙂 .

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And now for my topic of the week: Quilting Time.

On Thursday this week Maria invited Ida and me over for a day of quilting in her recently cleaned studio.

When we arrived we found her living room to be a feast for the eyes. She had her lovely Christmas quilts hanging on the wall.

and many other beautiful quilts folded over ladders.

Along with clocks! So many clocks! And they were all at different times!

So, we had to ask. Her answer got me to thinking about time – a thought very pertinent, since we’ve just started a new year. Time can crawl, or it can fly (like all of 2016). It is also of the essence, and this related to Maria’s reply.

She said that time is very, very precious. It’s the most valuable thing we have. Food, things, people, and just about everything else can be replaced, but when time is gone – it’s gone. She loves to go thrift store shopping and look for old or interesting clocks. This was the point when we noticed none of the clocks were at the current time. When asked she replied her clocks represented important dates in her life: her dad’s birthday, March 12, was 3:12 on one of the clocks. Her birthday, October 9, is 10:09. Each clock meant something. Wow! I had never noticed that a 12 hour clock could represent the dates for a 12 month year.

Then she showed us the one set for three o’clock to represent the time of Christ’s death for her sins. She said she has the alarm on her phone set for that time each day, so she will pause and remember His sacrifice. I think I may be in need of a few more clocks  🙂 .

We each got quite a bit of quilting done, plus a lot of good conversation, and a nice lunch out. Maria showed us the quilt she’s been working on for almost a year, Jinny Beyer’s Moonglow. She has one more border for the top to be finished.

Gorgeous! Thanks Maria, for a delightful, and insightful, day.

My wish for the new year is that you will have time to do what you love, and to spend with those you love. And that you will use it wisely. God bless you in 2017!


January 1, 2017, Uncategorized