Result(s) for: "Tallinn" keyword.

Tallinn, Estonia

A quick addition to last week’s pictures from Rostock, Germany. I didn’t want you to think I was the only one hugging German men. Wendy found two (Reinhard, and Klaus – the tour guide):

Wendy and 2 men

And Kristi (our fantastic travel planner) rated a kiss!

Reinhard and Kristi

Speaking of Kristi, she arranged for a phenomenal trio of classes while we were in Tallinn, Estonia. Estonia holds artists in very high regard. We began with a stop in a handicraft type shop. This shop had quite a variety of items (from hand knit sweaters to wooden trivets and so much in between). They were all made in traditional Estonian style.

Tallinn handcrafts

In the back room of the shop was an exhibit of fiber art. The artist’s made wall art inspired by jewelry (the jewelry was displayed in shadow boxes next to the art).

Estonian fiber art

This reminded me of a recent Milwaukee Art Quilters challenge called Bead Inspired (click here to see the quilts in that exhibit).

Many artists are trained at the Universities in Estonia, and the old town of Tallinn is filled with shops and studios featuring these very creative individuals. A short walk from the handcraft shop we discovered more fiber art for sale:

Tallinn Estonia fiber art E Tallinn-Estonian fiber art3 E Tallinn-Estonian fiber art5

What a feast for the eyes. But this was nothing – Kristi had scheduled our travelers to take classes with a group of Estonian artists! Our next stop was the studios of the Katariina Gild.

Here is a picture of the members of this “Gild” from their website:  http://katariinagild.eu/index.html (I highly recommend visiting their site! It starts in Estonian, but if you scroll down a ways it’s in English! Be sure to visit all the pages 🙂 )

Katariina Gild Estonia

We broke up into smaller groups and some of us took a class in Patchwork, making an embroidered and quilted bag:

E Tallinn-artist workshop-patchwork2 E Tallinn-artist workshop-patchwork3

Others took a Fiber Art class, and made broaches from yarn and other embellishments.

E Tallinn-artist workshop fiber broach3 E Tallinn-artist workshop-fiber broach

and there were even workshops in Leather Art. I found that intriguing, and the instructor, Pille, was very talented and very inspiring. In the first photo Jerrie and I are making business card wallets. In the second we’re posing with Pille and our finished creations. It was an interesting process, and I did buy one of her handmade books (on the shelf behind us).

E Tallinn-artist workshop-leather2

E Tallinn-artist workshop leather-JerriePelleMe

It was a wonderful day of inspiration and learning. I didn’t take any photographs of the finished projects (the patchworkers actually placed their projects into a packet and stitched it closed for the trip home – so none of the rest of us got to see them), but we’re having a cruise reunion in July and I’ll be inviting everyone to bring what they made for show and tell. Watch for pictures in a future post.

I wish we could have had another day in Estonia – what a wonderful place to explore!

 


June 15, 2014, Travel
Do They Make Quilts There?

This past Friday I received an email from a woman named Krystyna. Here’s what she wrote:

“Hello, I am half Estonian, born in the US and would love to connect to my heritage through quilting. I have been trying to locate a traditional Estonian quilt and hopefully one that isn’t embroidered. My searching brought me to your lovely site and I am wondering if you would have any idea of where I might find a pattern(s) for said traditional quilt(s). Or does this even exist, I can’t imagine that it wouldn’t.”

Krystyna’s request got me to thinking about all of the times Wendy and I have been preparing for one of our Sew We Go adventures, hopeful to find quilt shops and groups in the places we’ll visit, only to find – nothing.

When Wendy and I visited Tallinn, Estonia while cruising the Baltic Sea, we discovered a city with friendly people and a huge love for history, culture and art. It was our favorite port of call on that trip. We even were able to take classes from artists in the art district of the city. To read about it please go to: http://chrisquilts.net/blog/?s=Tallinn. We found “fiber art”, but no quilts.

In composing an answer to Krystyna, I got to thinking about a woman I know who is a missionary in Tallinn. I decided to write to her and her response was not only interesting, but she had suggestions that are applicable to quilters trying to find quilting patterns from other countries. I hope you will enjoy Denise’s response:

“Hi Chris, Wow, what an interesting question. 
As hard as it is to believe, there is no tradition of quilting here. That’s the short answer!

I have been to all the handicraft and agricultural fairs here in
Estonia over the past 12 years and have never even seen a quilt, nor
have I met or heard of any women who do it, and I have looked, believe
me. Perhaps it’s a result of being shut off from the rest of Europe
for centuries, but they use textiles they can grow: flax (linen) and
wool, neither which lend themselves to quilting. The indigenous
handicrafts being actively preserved today are Estonian embroidery,
weaving, felting, knitting and crocheting, and a kind of tatting.
Neighbors just bought angora rabbits to start harvesting their own fur
to make their winter hats, scarves and mittens. She will be hard
pressed trying to connect to Estonian culture through something that
doesn’t exist. That’s the long answer.

My recommendation is to adapt the colors and patterns of Estonian
woven tapestries and interpret them into a quilt, to combine her
passion for quilting with Estonian cultural references. It is very
Estonian to create something “new” and be inventive.

Each region in Estonia is represented in dress by it’s own distinct
colorful pattern of woven woolens, which could be easily adapted to a
quilt pattern of her own design. Most are three to five colors, and in
stripes. A couple of regions vary from that norm, but in all regions
the women make skirts and belts out of “their” local textile, which
they wear on national holidays and for special events. You know
exactly where a group of women is from by the stripe of their skirt.
The following link shows some of those patterns (the first word in
each pattern is the name of the county). There are more, I just can’t
find a repository that shows them all on one page:

https://isetehtu.ee/category/triibukangas-ja-seelikud/

This link shows a gathering of people celebrating in national dress:
http://folkart.ee/en/photo-gallery/airing-of-the-folk-costumespicnic-2016/

Hope this helps. Have a great day! In His Service, Denise”

I loved the idea of taking a traditional handicraft design and making it into a quilting pattern. The links Denise provided were very nice. I also found a few pictures while surfing the web that I think are inspiring. The first two were from: https://fancytigercrafts.com/search?q=Estonia (please visit their site. The pictures and stories were great).

 

The following woven designs could easily be converted into pieced patterns:

And this one would be lovely in appliqué:

I hope you can see the possibilities, no matter what country you’re interested in.

Thanks so much for your question, Krystyna, and for the in-depth response from Denise.

Have you ever made a quilt pattern inspired by a traditional handcraft from another country? I’d love to know more. Please send me pictures at: chris@chrisquilts.net.

.


May 21, 2017, Travel
Virtual Quilt Show – A Danish/American Challenge

Often I share things in my blog posts that pertain to places and events in southeastern, Wisconsin. I’m well aware that many of you live in other States. While putting together this week’s post about our Baltic cruise challenge, it occurred to me to mention that both of our upcoming Sew We Go adventures are currently priced without airfare. Our travel planner, Kristi, will work with each traveler to find them the best airfare possible and… since we’re not doing a “group flight”, she can help you arrange for flights from wherever you live!!!

(click here for Sisters, Oregon, July 8-13, or here for Europe October 9-19).

And now the quilts!

While on our wonderful cruise of the Baltic Sea, Wendy and I passed out “fat eighths” of a lovely blue/green batik, and asked our travelers, as well as the quilters we met at Kirstin’s Quilt in Roskilde, Denmark, to make something with it.

These were the “rules”:

Danish - American Quilt Challenge

And these were the fabrics:

Danish American Challenge fabric

The shop owner in Roskilde, our hostess Kirsten, designed a placemat pattern for our group – and even translated it into English for us. It was a very thoughtful gift:

Kirsten's pattern

 

Thanks to everyone who participated.

Here is our Virtual Quilt Show!

 

Mary Beth Weeks SWG placemats

by Mary Beth Weeks – “Attached is the project I made using the fabric you passed out to us on our (great!) Baltic cruise in May. I also included a very similar piece of fabric that I already had. I’m sure you recognize the place mat pattern as the one Kirsten gave us. I had only enough fabric to make two sets but my husband and I are using them now and enjoy the bright spots on our table.”

by Louise Sundquist - "I made four placemats using the challenge fabric and three other fabrics I purchased in Kirsten's shop."

by Louise Sundquist – “I made four placemats using Kirsten’s pattern, the challenge fabric, and three other fabrics I purchased in Kirsten’s shop.”

Ilse Jessen-Denmark

by Ilse Jessen – “I have always wanted to try this block. Now I had a chance to do it. Looking forward to seeing the other quilting items.”

by Eileen Diercks - "From the Danish/American challenge fabric I made a zippered pouch for my Kindle and its charging cord.   I used some of the “fancy” stitches on my machine, using a variegated green, blue and yellow thread which I had on hand, for the quilting.  For the lining I used a lime green batik fabric which I had in my stash, and the green zipper was also from my sewing supplies.  So it did not cost me anything extra for this handy pouch. Thanks for the challenge."

by Eileen Diercks – “From the Danish/American challenge fabric I made a zippered pouch for my Kindle and its charging cord. I used some of the “fancy” stitches on my machine, using a variegated green, blue and yellow thread which I had on hand, for the quilting. For the lining I used a lime green batik fabric which I had in my stash, and the green zipper was also from my sewing supplies. So it did not cost me anything extra for this handy pouch. Thanks for the challenge.”

Rostock, Germany

Nancy Hansen challenge piece

by Nancy Hansen – “The first photo is a border detail at Rostock Cathedral. The second is my attempt to replicate it.”

Margie Abbott Umbrellas

by Margie Abbott – “I just finished my challenge quilt. It is 46″x55”. It’s called “Dancing Umbrella” and was designed by Edyta Sitar. I used a brown batik in all but four of the blocks, where I used the blue challenge fabric to showcase the blue fabric. I enjoyed participating in this challenge and am anxious to see all the other entrants’ works of art.”

by Christina Yun - "Attached is a picture of my fabric challenge.  I used the challenge fabric for the top and the bottom of my smock cushion.  And, the remainder of the fabric I used as a ribbon for the doll's hair.  I had a lot of fun doing this challenge."

by Christina Yun – “Attached is a picture of my fabric challenge. I used the challenge fabric for the top and the bottom of my smock cushion. And, the remainder of the fabric I used as a ribbon for the doll’s hair. I had a lot of fun doing this challenge.”

by Karen Moore - A photo/Map memory quilt (note the addition of the pins she collected along the way)

by Karen Moore – A photo/map memory quilt (note the addition of the pins she collected along the way)

by Pam Merklein - "I used the fabric you gave us for the top portion of my “Oak Park Bag” and for the tabs and loop. The button was purchased in Tallinn, Estonia. I had a charm pack at home that provided the squares and the balance of the fabric was left from a senior HS gift quilt for my grandson. I look forward to using it and being reminded of our wonderful trip."

by Pam Merklein – “I used the fabric you gave us for the top portion of my “Oak Park Bag” and for the tabs and loop. The button was purchased in Tallinn, Estonia. I had a charm pack at home that provided the squares and the balance of the fabric was left from a senior HS gift quilt for my grandson. I look forward to using it and being reminded of our wonderful trip.”

Had a lot of fun making this table topper.   Have fond memories of the cruise. Thanks,  Jan Arndt

by Jan Arndt – “Had a lot of fun making this table topper. Have fond memories of the cruise.”

by Lisa Giesfeldt - Lisa made this small purse and said she "even used the ribbon that was wrapped around the fabric.  It's my zipper pull. The color worked with my batik choices."

by Lisa Giesfeldt – Lisa made this purse and said she “even used the ribbon that was wrapped around the fabric. It’s my zipper pull. The color worked with my batik choices.”

by Chris Kirsch - "I also made a tote. The fabric was mixed with many others is a tote pattern designed by a mutual friend, Kathy Frye. I used Wendy’s faux batik method to create the words “Sew We Go” for the front pocket of the bag."

by Chris Kirsch – “I also made a tote. The fabric was mixed with many others in a tote pattern designed by a mutual friend, Kathy Frye. I used Wendy’s faux batik method to create the words “Sew We Go” for the front pocket of the bag.”

"I also used the batik technique to put our logo on the pocket on the back of the bag. Kathy’s pattern is meant for a travel bag and this pocket has Velcro at the bottom, so the bag can be placed over the handle of a wheeled suitcase!"

“I used the batik technique once again, to put our logo on the pocket on the back of the bag. Kathy’s pattern is meant for a travel bag and this pocket has Velcro at the bottom, so the bag can be placed over the handle of a wheeled suitcase!”

And one more “non-challenge” picture! While in Helsinki we were treated to a visit to Marimekko Fabric. Nancy Hansen found a beautiful polished cotton and made it into a lovely jacket. She wore it to Patched Lives Quilt Guild this past month and it was stunning. She was kind enough to pose for a picture:

Nancy Hansen's jacketThanks Nancy!

 


November 23, 2014, Uncategorized
Sew We Go 2015

Traveling with friends who share your interest is always fun. Traveling with planners who share your interest adds an extra level of excitment! Our most recent Sew We Go adventure was a cruise on the Baltic Sea this past May. Visiting 6 different countries, seeing the sites and tasting the tastes would have been enough to make the trip memorable, but the most wonderful moments for Wendy and I were the dinner we had with Danish quilters at Kirstin’s Quilts in Roskilde,

dinner shot1

Watching Reinhard create German Blaudruck fabric in Rostadt,

Handdruck demo in Rostock

the fiber art classes at the Katerina Gild in Tallinn, Estonia,

E Tallinn-artist workshop fiber broach3

And we even left our mark on the Happy Talk wall in Copenhagen!

Sew We Go Copenhagen

We traveled with Norwegian Cruise Lines and truly enjoyed the Free Style Dining, wide variety of entertainment, and fine accommodations. While at sea Wendy and I taught a number of different classes and projects – allowing our travelers to participate in whichever ones tickled their fancy.

class time at sea

Our travel planner, Kristi, has a unique talent for adding side trips to our excursions that make our trips exceptional – and the plans we’re making for our next trip promise to be just as special and exciting.

So now we’re planning our next BIG AVENTURE!

Please consider joining us as we travel through London, Lisbon, and Barcelona with many special things to see and do along the way!

Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 11.53.22 PM

We’ll begin by flying into London. This is a destination on many “bucket lists”. Kristi specializes in working with each traveler to be sure your trip fits your needs and wants. We are hoping to spend an extra day or two here to tour the city, possibly visit a quilt shop or maybe even Liberty’s of London and hopefully meet some British quilters. We have no firm details yet, but have many ideas we’re pursuing. You could work with Kristi and plan to arrive earlier and see the special places in London you have on your bucket list.

From there we’ll travel to Southhampton and hopefully visit the Overlord Embroidery at the D-Day Museum. This work of fiber art was inspired by the Bayeux Tapestry,  and it traces in stunning visual form the progress of Overlord, from its origins in the dark days of 1940 to victory in Normandy in 1944. Here’s an excerpt from their interesting website:

Then we’ll board our luxury  ship, the Norwegian Epic and Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 11.54.52 PMcruise south, encircling the Iberian Peninsula with stops in Vigo, Spain, which was built over an ancient Roman settlement, on the slopes of a hill crowned by two old forts. The landscape and the architecture will provide wonderful inspiration for your next quilt.

Screen Shot 2014-09-21 at 3.03.24 PM

From there we’ll journey to Lisbon, Portugal. This capital city boasts ancient sites on every hillside. When I did a search to find what Lisbon was know for, this was the response I received: “Amazing food, beautiful beaches, lovely mountains, rich history… it is one of the most beautiful places in Europe. The handicrafts mentioned were linens and ceramic tiles!

Malaga, Spain is a port on the Mediterranean  Sea. It’s the birthplace of Pablo Picaso. It is also home to the Alcazaba, a Screen Shot 2014-09-21 at 4.23.57 PMrestored ancient fortress that dates back to the 11th century. From there the excavated ruins of a Roman amphitheater can be viewed.

Screen Shot 2014-09-21 at 3.32.29 PMWe’ll also visit Cartagena, Spain and end our cruise in the lovely city of Barcelona!

It’s a city designed to delight the senses where you can visit other-worldly modernist works of Gaudi such as Sagrada Familia, a cathedral over a hundred years in the making. If food is your interest, you may want to experience Basque tapas – plates of bite-sized goodies served atop a piece of bread – they’re a culinary trend in Barcelona.

We are just beginning to explore all the options that will be available to us – from a touring and a quilting stand point. There is also the possibility of staying on a few days in Barcelona or … it’s just a short plane ride from Barcelona to Madrid or Paris. The exciting part is that we will make the plans and you can just come along and enjoy the adventure. Won’t you please consider joining us in October of 2015. To get all the information, please go to the web page we have specifically designed to share all the details:  http://www.chrisquilts.net/trips/ . And feel free to contact us with any and all questions.

Upcoming Events

I have quite a variety of exciting workshops scheduled this semester at WCTC. You may access all of the information about these classes and more at wctc.edu (click on “Course Search”, click on “Fall Semester”, type “quilting” in the subject line, then click on “Submit”. Once there, click on the class name for pictures and descriptions!

Scrap Happy - October 11, 2014

Scrap Happy – October 11, 2014 – Bring your left over blocks, strips, and scraps and we’ll have great fun!

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 9.22.16 AM

Chop Blocks – October 17, 2014 – We’ll chop up 10″ squares and do a bit of simple piecing!

Snowperson Topper - November 14, 2014

Snowperson Topper – November 14, 2014 – the faces are actually the batting showing through. Loads of fun embellishing will be taught!

Woven Star Stockings - December 5, 2014

Woven Star Stockings – December 5, 2014 – The stars are woven from fabric strips and not pieced!

And for a bit of winter fun – my dear friend Wendy is teaching her ever popular wool felted mittens at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Art in Cedarburg.

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 9.13.15 AM
Visit the museums website: http://wiquiltmuseum.com/ to sign up!


September 21, 2014, Travel
Quilted Christmas Projects

During a guild “Show & Tell” last year, a member showed a quilt that grabbed me. My immediate reaction was “my daughter-in-law would love that!” I asked about the pattern and ordered it right away (you can find this pattern at: http://www.etsy.com/shop/FrivolousNecessity?ref=em).

Christmas-project1

Last week Betsy asked me to show her how to make Christmas covers for her throw pillows. We went shopping for the fabric, giving me insight into the colors she prefers. I was pleased to realize that the colors she chose were almost identical to those on the pattern (I guess I can guess her tastes pretty well :-)). So this week I found the pattern (under a pile in my studio!) and began tracing all the swirls onto fusible web, ironing them to the appropriate fabric, cutting them out and fusing them in place:

Christmas-project3

Here’s a quick “learn from my mistake”  tip – I knew I should use a press cloth of some sort when pressing the pieces onto the background. So I grabbed an older piece of parchment paper, not realizing it had some fusible residue on it, and pressed away. I ended up with unpleasant marks that wouldn’t come out. I was able to cover them with white fabric paint, but it would have been much easier if I had used a fresh press cloth!

Once the swirls were fused, it was time to secure them. The pattern included a number of methods for stitching them down, but I was looking for S-I-M-P-L-E, so I decided to sandwich the quilt layers together and cover it all with white netting!

Chrismas-project-3.5

This part made me smile because I’d saved the white netting from Brad and Betsy’s wedding. Betsy and her mom did a beautiful job of draping and swirling the reception hall in yards and yards of it. While we were cleaning up afterwards I rescued the netting before it hit the trash!

I then pinned the layers together, checking as I went for bits of thread and/or dog hair, which I removed from under the netting with a tweezers:

Chrismas-project4

Next I free motion quilted in white thread along the edges of every swirl, completing the background with quilted spirals. It was so much fun that I made a second one for my daughter in Washington.

Christmas-project-done

What Christmas projects are you working on??? I’d love to see pictures. Please send them to me at: clkquilt@gmail.com.

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Travel Opportunity!!!

Wendy and I are anxiously anticipating our Baltic adventure this coming May. We will be taking a group of quilters (and a few non-quilting companions) on a spectacular cruise and we have an opening we wanted to make you aware of:

Roommate needed to share balcony cabin on the Norwegian Star!

Sailing the Baltic Sea 17 May-29 May 2014

$3439 ($3314 if paying with cash or check)

Includes: cruise (incl. taxes & fees), pre & post stay (one night each) in Copenhagen, group airport transfers in Copenhagen, soft drinks and all meals on board, tours in Copenhagen before and after cruise, group excursions and free time in each port (Rostock, Germany; Tallinn, Estonia; St. Petersburg, Russia; Helsinki, Finland; Stockholm, Sweden), visits with local fiber artists, hands on classes and lectures on board, gratuities for ship staff, and loads of fun!


December 1, 2013, Appliqué
Sew We Go to the Baltics

Sew We Go jpg logo

Wendy and I now have the information for our eighth Sew We Go adventure. We would love to have you join us in May of 2014 on a Norwegian Cruise Line tour that will take us to Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Russia, Estonia and Germany. We’ll spend ten days seeing amazing sights, indulging in delicious cuisine, creating a memorable project and enjoying the company of other quilters. Here’s all the details:

Baltic Cruise logoNorwegian Cruise logo

We are so excited to announce our destination for 2014!  You will see places you may never have thought about visiting but you will be so glad you did.  This trip will feature a great variety of cultures, historical treasures, and wonderful food.  All without packing and unpacking!

As always, we will have many special extras planned including a pre-trip project, a cruising project, visits to local fabric and needle art shops, and loads of sharing of information via our Sew We Go blog prior to our grand adventure.  Remember – all projects are optional and non-quilter traveling companions are more than welcome to join us!

We will be sailing on the Norwegian Star which was built in 2001 and completely refurbished in 2010.  It is a smaller ship with a capacity for 2,346 guests.

Where are we going?  Check out this itinerary!

Day One - Copenhagen, Denmark

Day One – Copenhagen, Denmark

Day Two - Rostock (Warnemunde), Germany

Day Two – Rostock (Warnemunde), Germany

Day Three      at sea

Day Four - Tallinn, Estonia

Day Four – Tallinn, Estonia

Day Five and Six - St Petersburg, Russia

Day Five and Six – St Petersburg, Russia

Day Seven - Helsinki, Finland

Day Seven – Helsinki, Finland

Day Eight - Stockholm, Sweden

Day Eight – Stockholm, Sweden

Day Nine        at sea

Day Ten         Return Copenhagen

This ship features Freestyle Dining so you can dine wherever you want, whenever you want (of course, we hope you will join in the group meals we plan). How about this for variety: 11 restaurants, 9 bars/lounges; 2 pools (1 indoor lap), kids’ pool, 6 hot tubs, casino, shops, theater, library, internet café, spa, fitness center, sport court, golf driving net, walking/jogging track, teen club & youth center!

There will be loads of entertainment, too, including magic, music, comedy, murder mystery and more.  NCL offers entertainment from names you know – Second City, Shout!, Elements – no amateur talent shows here!

The Cities We Will Visit

Copenhagen, Denmark   In a country rich in Viking history, grand castles and lush green countryside, Copenhagen is a charming city of 17th- and 18th-century buildings, beautiful parks and gardens, pretty promenades along canals, and ancient winding streets made for walking.  Outdoor cafe-sitting and outings to the magical Tivoli Gardens are highlights.  Old Copenhagen is a warren chock-a-block with galleries, restaurants, boutiques, and antiques galore.

Rostock/Warnemunde, Germany   The fine old Hanseatic red-brick town of Rostock and its neighboring seaside resort, Warnemunde, are best known as the jumping-off points for Berlin, which is three to five hours away by train.  In Warnemunde, you’ll see rows of ancient, timber-framed houses, sleepy squares, and boats galore. Ice cream stalls and hundreds of screeching seagulls complete the seaside feel.  Medieval Rostock feels small thanks to miles of undulating countryside and forest around the town.  Although some of the city’s magnificent, old buildings were destroyed in World War II, you can still see grand marketplaces, bridges, city ramparts and gates.  Like many places in Germany, the city still brews excellent beer.

Tallinn, Estonia   Tallinn features a remarkably restored, medieval Old Town and still feels a part of the 1400s because of the cobblestone streets and medieval architecture. Walk the winding streets on cobblestones, past medieval towers and the old city wall, and you’ll feel like you’re taking a step back into a medieval storybook, with striking towers and historic brick buildings.  Tallinn is artsy and a delightful place to hang out and people-watch.  The shops, galleries, and antiques venues serve up some interesting finds such as elaborate weavings from cloth artists and modern art from local painters.

St. Petersburg, Russia   The beautiful city Peter the Great founded in 1703, in what was then swampland, has unbelievably sumptuous Czarist-era palaces, onion-domed churches and the lovely Neva River. Peter was inspired by London, Paris, and Vienna and carefully developed the city by plan, creating canals and passageways.  Most of the design remains intact today.  It is a fascinating place with a lurid past that’s fit for a romance novel.  St. Petersburg was the capital of Imperial Russia from 1712 to 1914 and remains Russia’s cultural capital.  The city itself is like a living museum. You are likely to find yourself oohing and aahing at the architecture art is a key attraction. Visit the Hermitage, home to significant collections of Matisses, Picassos, and Rembrandts.

Helsinki, Finland  Helsinki is a city with a strange mélange of identities.  Maybe it’s the Russian influence.  Maybe it’s the strong appreciation of contemporary design (the city is home to Marimekko, Kalevala, and Iittala). Or it could be the dark, cold and snowy winters that last half the year.  One can find both the historic Helsinki (founded in 1550) in its monuments and cathedrals or the sleek Helsinki at the avant-garde museums of art and design.

Stockholm, Sweden   Stockholm is the largest city in Scandinavia, was founded in 1252, and comprises 14 islands.  The premier tourist attraction is Gamla Stan (Old Town), one of the largest neighborhoods of 16th-century buildings in Europe.  Cobblestone streets and arms-width alleys criss-cross Gamla Stan. There, you’ll also find the 18th-century Royal.  Offsetting the city’s bustle and buildings are large swatches of green space. The Ekoparken, or eco-park, curves for six miles through a couple of the busiest islands and along one side of the downtown business district.

The Details

The cost for this trip will range from $2,300 to $3,000 per person, sharing a cabin, depending on which cabin category you select, plus airfare.  This ship features inside cabins, outside cabins with a picture window, or a balcony cabin with floor to ceiling balcony doors.  All cabins have one queen bed which can be separated into two twins.

Our trip package will include cruise, port fees, cruise taxes, airport transfers in Copenhagen, prepaid mandatory service charges onboard, soft drink beverages (incl. tax & gratuity), and private shore excursions for our group.

Airfares will be announced this summer but we expect them to be around $1,000.

Additional expenses will be personal optional services (spa, internet, etc.), alcoholic drinks, shopping expenditures, and any pre- or post-stays you may decide to add to this dream vacation. 

Our travel agent is Kristi Mirocha. Please contact Kristi via email, phone, or mail to be placed on the list for additional information and registration forms as the details are finalized:

Kristi Mirocha · Journeys & Gatherings · 2060 Hawthorne Drive, Elm Grove, WI  53122 · 262-786-6763 · kristi@journeysandgatherings.com

Kristi's logo

For a printable version of this information click here:  SWS Save the Date Flyer (1)


March 17, 2013, Travel